What Happens If You Develop A SCAR From A Medication?

The first step is getting evaluated by a specialist, either in a dermatological clinic or the hospital. Finding someone who has expertise in managing these types of reactions is critical. A doctor (usually a dermatologist) may biopsy your skin, and they may have to start systemic Medications that suppress your immune system. Sometimes, patients with SCARs also require a stay in a hospital.

The most important thing you can do is to keep an eye on your skin and its symptoms if you’re taking a new medication, or even if you’ve increased the dose of an old medication. If you suspect that you may be dealing with one of these SCARs, be sure to seek help from an expert.

Like a board-certified dermatologist, so that you can rest assured that you’re getting the care you need. Patients who are treated appropriately generally do well. Your doctors should also report these reactions to the FDA.

Once you’re on the mend, things can start to get back to normal, but it’s important to follow up with your doctors because there are some long-term issues that are important to pay attention to.

Ultimately your doctors and healthcare team will advise you on what exactly is safe in the future. Remember that if you’re worried about one of these reactions, it’s important to stop the medication as soon as possible, but with the input of your doctors.

 

 

  • In late March, the FDA approved a new therapy for advanced prostate cancer that is metastasizing, or spreading, in the body. Called Pluvicto (and also lutetium-177-PSMA-617), and delivered by intravenous infusion, the treatment can seek out and destroy tumors that are still too small to see with conventional types of medical imaging.
  • Pluvicto is approved specifically for men who have already been treated with other anticancer therapies, including chemotherapy and hormonal therapies that block the tumor-promoting hormone testosterone.
  • The drug contains two parts: one that binds to a protein on prostate cancer cell surfaces called PSMA, and a radioactive particle that kills the cancer cells. Most normal cells do not contain PSMA, or do only at very low levels. This allows Pluvicto to attack tumors while sparing healthy tissues.
  • To confirm whether a man is eligible for the drug, doctors first inject a radioactive tracer that travels the bloodstream looking for and then sticking to PSMA proteins.
  • Cancer cells flagged by the tracer will show up on a specialized scanning technology called positron-emission tomography. About 80% of prostate cancer patients have PSMA-positive tumors; for those who do not, the treatment is ineffective.

 

Advancements For Improving Health Outcomes

Quality and Safety in Clinical Operations is a Harvard Medical School course being held in a live virtual format from  This Continuing Education course will focus on ways to identify gaps and develop successful, sustainable, scalable interventions that lead to improved outcomes.

You will leave this course with a pathway to review your institution’s current program and identify ways to advance strategically and tactically to impact outcomes. Lessons learned from the COVID-19 will be highlighted, including the need to aggressively advance our institutional approach to equity.